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Archive for November 26th, 2010

Black Friday has become synonymous with deals and discounts, so what better time to take a look at the Yankees’ best bargains and biggest busts from 2010.

Player Value Versus Salary, Offense

Name WAR Value ($mn) Salary Difference Premium/ Discount
Brett Gardner 5.4 21.5 $452,500 $21,047,500 4751%
Francisco Cervelli 1.1 4.4 $410,800 $3,989,200 1071%
Austin Kearns* 0.3 1.2 $249,975 $950,025 480%
Robinson Cano 6.4 25.5 $9,000,000 $16,500,000 283%
Curtis Granderson 3.6 14.3 $5,500,000 $8,800,000 260%
Marcus Thames 0.6 2.3 $900,000 $1,400,000 256%
Nick Swisher 4.1 16.4 $6,850,000 $9,550,000 239%
Jorge Posada 2.4 9.7 $13,100,000 -$3,400,000 74%
Mark Teixeira 3.5 14 $20,625,000 -$6,625,000 68%
Alex Rodriguez 3.9 15.4 $33,000,000 -$17,600,000 47%
Derek Jeter 2.5 9.8 $22,600,000 -$12,800,000 43%
Juan Miranda 0 0.1 $400,000 -$300,000 25%
Nick Johnson 0.1 0.3 $6,850,000 -$6,550,000 4%
Lance Berkman* 0 -0.2 $4,828,500 -$5,028,500 NA
Randy Winn -0.3 -1 $1,100,000 -$2,100,000 NA
Ramiro Pena -0.2 -0.8 $412,100 -$1,212,100 NA

*Based on pro-rated salary.
Source: fangraphs.com, Cots Contracts and Baseball-reference.com

On offense, Brett Gardner gave the Yankees the biggest bang for their buck by providing over $21 million in value, according to fangraphs.com, while only being paid a shade above the minimum. Interestingly, the Yankees four highest paid offensive players underperformed their salaries by at least 25%. Even if you take into account the flaws in UZR that make up a portion of fangraph’s player values, the upside down nature of the chart above is still rather striking. Aside from Gardner’s extraordinary outperformance, the biggest surprise on the list is Cervelli, who provided value at over 10x his salary. However, that assessment seems to be one that is out of whack with both Cervelli’s real performance and the market value for players of his ilk.

Player Value Versus Salary, Pitchers

Name WAR Value ($mn) Salary Difference Premium/ Discount
Phil Hughes 2.4 9.5 $447,000 $9,053,000 2125%
Ivan Nova* 0.5 1.8 $98,765 $1,701,235 1823%
Joba Chamberlain 1.4 5.5 $487,975 $5,012,025 1127%
David Robertson 0.7 2.9 $426,650 $2,473,350 680%
Boone Logan 0.4 1.5 $590,000 $910,000 254%
CC Sabathia 5.1 20.4 $24,285,714 -$3,885,714 84%
Andy Pettitte 2.3 9.2 $11,750,000 -$2,550,000 78%
Mariano Rivera 1.7 6.7 $15,000,000 -$8,300,000 45%
Kerry Wood* 0.4 1.5 $3,499,965 -$1,999,965 43%
A.J. Burnett 1.3 5.2 $16,500,000 -$11,300,000 32%
Sergio Mitre 0 0.1 $850,000 -$750,000 12%
Javier Vazquez -0.2 -0.8 $11,500,000 -$12,300,000 NA
Damaso Marte -0.1 -0.6 $4,000,000 -$4,600,000 NA
Chad Gaudin -0.7 -3 $737,500 -$3,737,500 NA
Dustin Moseley* -0.4 -1.7 $217,500 -$1,917,500 NA
Chan Ho Park -0.2 -0.7 $1,200,000 -$1,900,000 NA

*Based on pro-rated salary.
Source: fangraphs.com, Cots Contracts and Baseball-reference.com

Not surprisingly, Phil Hughes provided the most value in excess of his salary. The premium contributions of the next four pitchers on the list, however, are eyebrow raising. Otherwise, every other member of the staff underperformed their paycheck. It should be noted, however, that both C.C. Sabathia and Andy Pettitte provided immense value, while closers like Mariano Rivera tend to be undervalued using WAR. By far, the Yankees biggest bust was Javier Vazquez, who actually provided negative value despite earning a hefty $11.5 million. Salary aside, Chad Gaudin proved to be the biggest drain on the team by posting a negative contribution of $3 million, or $1 million more than the salaries of the Hughes, Nova, Chamberlain, Robertson and Logan…combined.

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